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Watershed Geology Lab

 

 

 
Syllabus for GEOL 360/360L
Geomorphic Systems - 4 credits
Prerequisite(s): GEOL 260 and GEOL 260L
http://hydro.csumb.edu

 

Offered each Fall Semester

Syllabus not yet posted

 

mb_canyon

last updated 1/25/17

Geomorphic Systems is the study of landforms and landscapes in the context of interpreting both deep and near-surface earth processes. This view of the Monterey Submarine Canyon exemplifies the rish materials we will work with in the classroom and field

Instructor: DoSmith@CSUMB.edu,
Office Hours: By appointment
Office: Rm. E207, Science Center (Bldg. 53)
Ph: (831) 582-4696

 Lecture: Friday 9:00-11:50
Room E136, Science Center             

Lab: Friday 12:00-2:50
Room E136, Science Center

Fieldtrips
Parking lot of Bldg. 13

Text:

1) KEY CONCEPTS IN GEOMORPHOLOGY 1st ED--link to e-book

2) Stream Channel Reference Sites (Harrrelson et al., 1994)   Free 5 megabyte pdf

Other Course Materials: Sturdy shoes/boots, 3H pencil (mechanical or wood), 3-4 colored pencils eraser, "Rite-in-the-rain" field notebook, calculator, clipboard, small daypack, water bottle, warm clothes, light rain gear (poncho or jacket).

Introduction

"Geomorphic Systems" is the study of deep and shallow Earth processes that integrate through time to shape the landforms and landscapes that compose our physical environment. Once the link between process and landscape is understood, then we can read the landscape to interpret the present and past Earth processes active in a region. The societal applications for that knowledge include land-use planning, geologic hazard mapping, ecosystem restoration and predicting the effects of global climate change. Ecosystem restoration includes either reconstructing an equilibrium landscape in a disturbed site, or encouraging the surface processes that will form the equilibrium landscape over time. Therefore, the practice of ecosystem restoration requires a fundamental understanding of the intimate links between earth processes and the landforms they construct. Global change affects rates and styles of geomorphic change, therefore, we can read paleoclimate from the soils and landforms we study. This course forms an essential bridge between ESSP 260 and the ESSP 460 series as a student grows toward a working knowledge of ecosystem policy and management. We will study together through individual and group fieldwork, readings, discussion and lecture. The assessment of the course will include a combination of practical exercises, examinations, field notes, miscellaneous assignments, and a written/oral report recording a cleary defined independent project accomplished during the semester.

This course fulfills part of the "Natural Science Competency" outcome for the Watershed Systems concentration of the Environmental Science (ESTP) major. It can also serve as an elective for any degree in the Division of Science and Environmental Policy.

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